Parents May Take FMLA Leave for Special Education Meetings

A parent’s attendance at IEP meetings is essential, but some parents may struggle to take time off in order to attend these meetings. If this sounds like you, you are in luck! A recently published opinion from the Department of Labor (DOL) details how parents can take leave under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) in order to attend meetings to develop your child’s Individualized Education Plan (IEP), known in Connecticut as PPT meetings.

By |2019-09-09T15:59:02-04:00September 16th, 2019|Parents, Special Education Services, Uncategorized|

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer/Questioning (LGBTQA) Youth in School

While June was officially Pride Month, the importance of creating safe, supportive and inclusive school environments for all children including LGBTQA students must a year-round effort. Evidence suggests that a school’s failure to provide a safe, supportive and non-discriminatory environment for transgender and gender non-conforming students can result in significant harm to the child.

Ten Things You Should Know About Section 504 and Expulsion in Connecticut

If your child has a 504 plan and is facing expulsion, you should know that your child has rights. In a nutshell, the school district cannot expel students for behavior that is caused by or substantially related to their disability.

Fry, Exhaustion, and Service Dogs: Why the Supreme Court’s Decision About a Dry Legal Issue Matters

The Supreme Court recently heard oral arguments in the case of Fry v. Napoleon Community Schools to decide whether children with disabilities have to “exhaust their administrative remedies” before going to court to enforce their right to use a service animal.

DOJ Continues to Enforce the Right of Children to Bring Service Dogs to School

More and more children with disabilities are benefiting from service dogs. Some children have service dogs who alert them to the presence of allergens. Some service dogs alert to an oncoming seizure. Still other service dogs are trained to interrupt self-injurious behavior, provide stability for children with mobility impairments, or prevent the child from running away. Service dogs help children with disabilities develop independence they would not otherwise have. When children use service dogs, the law allows them to be accompanied by their service dog, even in school